Scenario-Based Training

You can learn more about my book, Scenario-Based Training with X-Plane and Microsoft Flight Simulator, at the publisher’s website, here. That page also includes a complete table of contents, links to a sample chapter, and the files that complement the text.

To learn more about PC-based simulations, aviation training devices (ATD), and using simulation to complement flight training and maintain currency, see the following items at my blog:

Simulations, Flight Simulators, FTDs, and ATDs

New AC for ATDs

New IFR Currency Rules and Other Changes to 14 CFR Part 61

Changes to X-Plane Files

The developers of X-Plane frequently change the format of the Situation files that save initial conditions for specific virtual flights in X-Plane. Each time the developer updates X-Plane (often, and not on a published schedule), the Situation file format changes. If you can’t load the Situation files provided to complement the scenarios in the book, you can use the description of each lesson (that is, the scenario) to quickly set up the Cessna (or your choice of aircraft) at the location where a particular virtual flight begins.

It’s important to understand that, as noted in Chapter 10, “Using the Scenarios in This Book,” the Situations just set the initial conditions (aircraft type, location, weather, etc.) for a scenario. They’re not scenarios themselves or interactive “missions” (see especially p. 109–110). The Situations (for X-Plane) and Flights (for FSX) are just conveniences I supplied to help readers quickly load the initial conditions.

The scenarios in the book are, in effect, the lesson plans, and if you can’t load the X-Plane Situation files provided to complement the scenarios in the book, you can use the description of each lesson to quickly set up the Cessna (or your choice of aircraft) at the location where a particular virtual flight begins. I’ve provided a Microsoft Excel workbook that includes the key information about each scenario and complements the descriptions in the book. In fact, you could use the scenarios in the book (i.e., the lesson plans) with any simulation (e.g., an aviation training device), as the core of a flight lesson in an airplane, as ground-school exercises, and so forth.

For more information about X-Plane and Situations, see Chapter 6, “A Quick Guide to X-Plane,” and the help resources described there.

For more information about the resources associated with the book, see the Readme document (PDF) available for download at the publisher’s website.